Tag Archives: The Deluge of Elias

Lament for the Living is OUT NOW! And free scifi ebook

Tadadadaaaaaaa ‘Lament for the Living’ is out.  The first book in the Lament for the Living series that follows the Survivors of a zombie.  It’s also one of the few zombie books written by a British author, and set in the UK (Wales to be precise).

Here be the links to said tome:

So far it’s been read in the UK, Ireland, USA and Canada and is even being perused by the Man in the Mun!

The release of ‘Lament for the Living’ coincided with the one year anniversary of ‘The Deluge of Elias’ which is FREEEEEEE this weekend as a double whammy celebration.

Along with promoting these titles over social media, I’ve also starting writing the next release which is a prequel to ‘The Deluge of Elias’.  Set roughly now, the new (as yet untitled) book covers the cataclysm that leaves the inhabitants of The Dome as the only surviving humans.  This first book in the series covers the cataclysm, aftermath, and the survivors realisation they are the last humans, and everything else is gone.

It’s all very exciting.

Find my other work here: http://www.tbfmedia.com/bibliography/

Have a great weekend peeps.

That Moment When….

That moment when…. you discover that the title you’ve taken ages to decide on is already in use.  You get the idea for a story, mould it in your mind, plot out the structure, then a title.  It needs a title, even if it’s just a working title.  A flash of inspiration, maybe a path along a number of different title avenues and then you have it: The Title.

Yes!  You start using it.  It sounds good, it flows, it describes your story, it’s already in use.  Wait!  What?  It’s a sad fact that nothing is original now, only the approach to it, and as time goes on the order of words will soon run out.

I’ve just discovered that the series title (rather than the story title) of my next work is already in use.  I can honestly say that I’ve never heard of the series, or games that the title is in use with, and I did wrack my brain when coming up with it.  My next book was titled ‘Dead Reign: Lament for the Living’.  ‘Dead Reign’ being the series title, ‘Lament for the Living’ the first book.  I had ‘Lament for the Living’ first (actually, the working title was ‘Sackcloth Versus the Undead’) and then went in search of the series title.

Zombie film titles are very familiar to me, and I know quite a lot of book titles too (despite not reading most of them) and so I was thinking of something that was different to them.  I wanted to avoid the use of Zombie, or Z, or ‘of the’ in there, so I got to thinking about what the story was about.  Set about three years after the zombie apocalypse when zombies rule the earth.  Rule. Rulers. Kings. Queens.  What do they do?  Reign.  They’re dead.  Dead Reign!  YES!  I’d done it.  Never heard of it, and it’s fairly cool.

Now today I idly Googled ‘Dead Reign’ which is something that I’d never done before as I was so convinced that it was mine, all mine.  And there it was: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead_Reign Dead Reign by Palladium Books, but not a book, an RPG.  But not any RPG, a zombie survival RPG add-on for something called Rifter.

I considered my options at this point.  The story is still in development and the last thing I want is to release it and then have copyright or trade mark issues rearing their ugly heads should it do well.  So there really is no option, I’m going to have to drop the ‘Dead Reign’ suffix.  Now for another round of series title brain storming combined with a more judicious use of google.

Interestingly, ‘The Deluge of Elias’ was going to be called ‘Deluge’, or ‘The Deluge’ until I searched those titles on Amazon and so decided to base the title on the name of the main character.  Meanwhile, ‘Hannibal House’ was so called because of the association with a strong, single-minded leader and it’s only one letter away from ‘cannibal’ (although there are no cannibals in the story, that was part of my naming convention).  After I wrote it I discovered a building in London that I’d seen many times while living there is also called Hannibal House.

Oh well.

Available now:

The Deluge of Elias by David NicolLong after a cataclysm that destroyed humanity had been forgotten, the descendants of the original survivors live in a protected Dome governed by a set of rules known as ‘The Orders’.

The rigid enforcement of The Orders now threatens the people they were designed to protect. Elias has a solution, except it puts him on a course of action that is at odds with the rules that he has been charged to rigorously uphold. On top of every thing else, the solution came to him in the form of a dream; in a time and place where no one dreams.

Can he save the last vestiges of humanity, or even himself?

The Deluge of Elias from Amazon US

The Deluge of Elias from Amazon UK

Hannibal House by David Nicol‘Sometimes you don’t choose the house, the house chooses you’.

The supernatural story of a house that attracts lost souls. Set in South West Wales, Hannibal House tells the story of Troy who leaves Seattle in search of his roots.

Unsure of what he’s really looking for, Troy comes across Hannibal House. Immediately infatuated with the building he sets out to possess it, or is the house aiming to possess him…

 

Hannibal House from Amazon US

Hannibal House from Amazon UK

Catch me on twitter: @davidxnicol
Check me out on Amazon: David Nicol Author Page
See what I’m up to on GoodReads.com: David Nicol on GoodReads

Self-publishing Ponderings

David Nicol I’ve read many posts by authors defending their decision to self publish.  This isn’t one of those posts.  I don’t see the need to defend that decision, rather I think people should consider why they would want to go down the traditional publishing route.

I’m proud to stand up and say “Yes, I’m an independent author, yes, I self publish.”  Why wouldn’t I be?

Historically there’s been a stigma attached to self publishing due to vanity presses.  If you’re not familiar with the term, in a nutshell, vanity publishing allowed people to publish their books, for a fee.  However, the costs involved meant that a book published via a vanity press had a higher unit cost than a traditionally published book.  If an author wanted to make any money, or break even after using a vanity press, they would need to charge more for their tome than a mainstream, established book (plus they also had to source their own outlets for their books).

Chances are, if you’re an aspiring author, when you see the likes of Twilight, The Hunger Games, or *shudder* Fifty Shades of Grey getting the top spots, and featured everywhere you think “that could be me”.  It could be, and why shouldn’t it be?  After all, your work is probably more original, less cliched and better written than those titles that languish in the popular consciousness.

The traditional wisdom is that to be successful you can’t be a good author, you have to be a great author.  You have to live and breathe your passion and then, once you’ve emotionally exhausted yourself you have to lie prostrate at the feet of a publisher/agent and beg for a chance to be heard.

What a load of crap.

Excuse my French, but Fifty Shades of Grey has shown that any old shit can be a best seller.  Reading parts of that book makes me feel like a Nobel Laureate.  And maybe that’s the problem that many new authors have.  They create works of literature rather than pulp fiction.

Publishers want to sell units.  Publishing houses are businesses, they want authors who write profit making commodities, not literature.  Publishing is going the way of the music and film industries where it’s the smaller indie providers who produce the majority of the works of value, the works that touch you, that live with you, that make you think.  At the same time, the large powerhouses try to beat down and pour scorn on the indies while pushing their own watered down insipid rubbish to the masses.

Now this seems like I’m being a big fat Negative Nancy about publishing.  That’s not where I’m going with this.  To be honest, if a publisher offered me a deal that was agreeable then I’d probably take it.  Publishers allow a minority of authors to break in to the mainstream, and if that’s your goal, then good luck to you.

What I’m saying is that if you choose to be an independent author, to self publish, then you shouldn’t spend your time justifying your decision. Instead, spend your time writing, honing your craft.  Build your following, create the best work you can and be a success on your own terms.

In the event that a publisher does come knocking, remember that you’re doing them a favour by allowing them to exploit your work.  It’s not the other way around, and YOU should be the one benefiting from YOUR work.

My indie writer manifesto

I will –

  1. Produce the most professional work I can
  2. Fully develop my characters and plot
  3. Ensure that my work is proofread, spellchecked and edited
  4. Not compromise my vision to please a specific market

Available now:

The Deluge of Elias by David Nicol

Long after a cataclysm that destroyed humanity had been forgotten, the descendants of the original survivors live in a protected Dome governed by a set of rules known as ‘The Orders’.

The rigid enforcement of The Orders now threatens the people they were designed to protect. Elias has a solution, except it puts him on a course of action that is at odds with the rules that he has been charged to rigorously uphold. On top of every thing else, the solution came to him in the form of a dream; in a time and place where no one dreams.

Can he save the last vestiges of humanity, or even himself?

The Deluge of Elias from Amazon US

The Deluge of Elias from Amazon UK

Hannibal House by David Nicol

‘Sometimes you don’t choose the house, the house chooses you’.

The supernatural story of a house that attracts lost souls. Set in South West Wales, Hannibal House tells the story of Troy who leaves Seattle in search of his roots.

Unsure of what he’s really looking for, Troy comes across Hannibal House. Immediately infatuated with the building he sets out to possess it, or is the house aiming to possess him…

Hannibal House from Amazon US

Hannibal House from Amazon UK
 
 
 
 
Catch me on twitter: @davidxnicol
Check me out on Amazon: David Nicol Author Page
See what I’m up to on GoodReads.com: David Nicol on GoodReads

‘Hannibal House’ is now available

Today, ‘Hannibal House’ launched on Amazon. Before we launch in to the blurb that goes with it I’d like to thank those who have been involved in helping tweak the story to the finished version. I received some fantastic feedback from those involved in the beta so thank you to all involved.

Those who provided feedback will be receiving a personalised copy of ‘Hannibal House’ via email.

And now, on to the main event:

Hannibal House by David Nicol

‘Sometimes you don’t choose the house, the house chooses you’.

The supernatural story of a house that attracts lost souls. Set in South West Wales, Hannibal House tells the story of Troy who leaves Seattle in search of his roots.

Unsure of what he’s really looking for, he comes across Hannibal House. Immediately infatuated with the building he sets out to possess it, or is the house aiming to possess him…

Available on Amazon:

(UK) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hannibal-House-ebook/dp/B008LDK2PG

(US) http://www.amazon.com/Hannibal-House-ebook/dp/B008LDK2PG

 

And the futuristic dystopian short story ‘The Deluge of Elias’ is also available:

The Deluge of Elias by David Nicol

(US) http://www.amazon.com/The-Deluge-of-Elias-ebook/dp/B0082FRKNU

(UK) http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Deluge-of-Elias-ebook/dp/B0082FRKNU

Deluge of Elias – New Cover

I decided that ‘The Deluge of Elias’ needed a new and totally original cover. This cover needed to have three elements to it: a figure, moisture, and decay/rust. Those elements are prevalent in the story and so the image began forming in my head.

Stock images wouldn’t cut the mustard this time, although they’d make an appearance for the background. I needed a model for the face. Hmm, where can I get a model from at this time of night? I thought, looking in the mirror. OH! Hey there handsome. You’ve got the look of a man with the world on his shoulders.

The problem with me being the model is that I’m usually the one behind the camera. That’s what I trained as, and that’s where I’m comfortable. I also have no illusions about ever being a model (let’s get that straight right now). Enter stage right: the wife.

Imagine the conversation went like this: So honey… after covering me in vaseline you get to throw water in my face while taking photographs.

Sounds like something out of Fifty Shades of Suburbia, and it could have been, but it wasn’t. Anyway, my other half seemed keen on the idea of potentially waterboarding me for some twisted reason so we got to work.

I think that Wifey dearest enjoyed chucking water in my face as the photo shoot took a lot longer than seemed strictly necessary to get the image I was looking for. Some editing time later and here we have the new cover for ‘The Deluge of Elias’:

The Deluge of Elias by David Nicol

Catch me on twitter: @davidxnicol
Check me out on Amazon: David Nicol Author Page
See what I’m up to on GoodReads.com: David Nicol on GoodReads

Sci-Fi short story ‘The Deluge of Elias’ is available now on Kindle:

Available from Amazon.com

Available from Amazon.co.uk

The Deluge of Elias – updated

I’ve just spent the best part of the day re-editing ‘The Deluge of Elias’ (the dystopian sci-fi short story in case you’re new here).  During the conversion from straight .doc format to HTML I was able to pick up and correct a number of errors, and expand on some sections to give it more depth.

It’s been a while since I worked in pure HTML so it was quite enjoyable to ‘get my hands dirty’ again.

Some additions to the original version are an encoded version of the cover, a note from me and then an introduction to ease the reader in to the world of Elias.  I did this as some readers felt the story was lacking some background information relating to The Dome.  Although I had intended to convey one of the main themes of the story (the control of information) by alluding to a total black out of everything that precedes the present; it was obvious that it didn’t come across as clearly as I hoped.

As I intend to continue write about The Dome I have deliberately avoided giving any details about how it came about, so hopefully the information presented in the new introduction will plug some of the holes, but leave the reader still wanting more.

At the conclusion of the story I’ve also included a teaser to the next short story that I’ll be producing.

Catch me on twitter: @davidxnicol
Check me out on Amazon: David Nicol Author Page
See what I’m up to on GoodReads.com: David Nicol on GoodReads

Sci-Fi short story ‘The Deluge of Elias’ is available now on Kindle:

Available from Amazon.com
Available from Amazon.co.uk

First Sale of The Deluge of Elias

Today I discovered that ‘The Deluge of Elias’ had made a sale on Amazon.com. On the day of release I made the story free for 24 hours and the reports showed 123 downloads.

A number of the people who downloaded it then were known to me so this is the first “wild card” reader so it will be interesting to see what feedback, if any, they leave.

To the mystery purchaser: thank you, and please, let me know your thoughts.

Catch me on twitter: @davidxnicol
Check me out on Amazon: David Nicol Author Page
See what I’m up to on GoodReads.com: David Nicol on GoodReads

Sci-Fi short story ‘The Deluge of Elias’ is available now on Kindle:

Available from Amazon.com
Available from Amazon.co.uk

The Deluge of Elias

‘The Deluge of Elias’ can be found exclusively on Amazon.com here, or Amazon.co.uk here

The rigid enforcement of The Orders now threatens the people they were designed to protect. Elias has a solution, except it puts him on a course of action that is at odds with the rules that he has been charged to rigorously uphold. On top of every thing else, the solution came to him in the form of a dream; in a time and place where no one dreams.

Can he save the last vestiges of humanity, or even himself?

‘The Deluge of Elias’ touches on multiple themes including the formation of religion, the social control it creates and the self destructive nature of totalitarian regimes. Do you dare to dream of another way?

*This is a short story, not a short book. The story and world described here is the introduction to a series of full length books that tell the story to the point of The Deluge of Elias, and what happens next.

Inspiration

The inspiration for ‘The Deluge of Elias’ comes from the many flood, or deluge, stories that exist in many cultures across the world. The version that is most familiar to me is that of Noah from the Christian Bible and Mulsim Koran. If you’re familiar with the story then skip to the next paragraph. In the tale, God is unhappy with humanity and so decides to wipe out all living things with a mighty flood. The only people deemed worthy of survival are Noah and his close family (and two of every animal). In the Biblical story Noah is given instructions directly from God about how to survive the coming deluge.

In ‘The Deluge of Elias’ all semblance of religion has been replaced by The Orders and the existence of any god or gods is forgotten by the populace by design. When constructing the story I considered how, if there was a god, a message of salvation could be relayed. Angels, visions, signs in the heavens, even the gooey mess made by the livers of animals have all been used as ways of gods delivering messages to humanity in literature and oral traditions, but none of those were practical to the environment of Elias. With everything so tightly controlled the most appropriate method of conveying a message would be through dreams. Of course, things are never really that simple and so the removal of the ability to dream was introduced.

The Dome

Like many myths and oral traditions the story relates to a tiny geographical area. In this case the Dome in which about 1000 people live. The origin of the Dome is deliberately made unclear in the story to reinforce the theme of lost knowledge. The Orders have effectively wiped out history in favour of its own totalitarian rules for existence which the inhabitants of the Dome obey without question. The Orders efficiently maintain the status quo in the Dome although, like many things, their original function was to teach the adherents how to live and survive. This concept comes from the similarities of many religions that specify things like what to eat, how to be clean and how to treat one another. These similarities and ultimate disparities are mentioned in the story.

Ultimately, like the rules that The Orders have superceded, parts become less relevant over time; when rigidly enforced inhibit the growth of humanity as a whole.

Construction

The themes of ‘The Deluge of Elias’ dictated the emphasis on the the imagination of the reader to fill in the blanks between what was written, what was implied, and what was left unwritten. The origin of the Dome is never mentioned, the events that led up to the totalitarianism of The Orders are also omitted to reinforce the feeling that the Dome is a microcosm of its own existence where you don’t question why things are they way they are, you accept it and that is how, to living memory, it has always been.

As a short story, the idea was to tell the tale, provide the framework of the workings of the world of Elias and then have the reader fill in the blanks as per their interpretation. So far no two readers have had the same experience of the story. That pleases me.

‘The Deluge of Elias’ can be found exclusively on Amazon.com here, or Amazon.co.uk here

Catch me on twitter: @davidxnicol
Check me out on Amazon: David Nicol Author Page
See what I’m up to on GoodReads.com: David Nicol on GoodReads

Sci-Fi short story ‘The Deluge of Elias’ is available now on Kindle:

Available from Amazon.com

Available from Amazon.co.uk